Etymonline.com View Learning

education Origin and meaning of education by Online

Details: education (n.) 1530s, "child-rearing," also "the training of animals," from French education (14c.) and directly from Latin educationem (nominative educatio) "a rearing, training," noun of action from past-participle stem of educare (see educate).Originally of instruction in social codes and manners; meaning "systematic schooling and training for work" is from 1610s.

› Verified 1 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/education Go Now

• Get more: Educate etymology of the wordGo Now

educational Origin and meaning of educational by Online

Details: educational (adj.) 1650s, "due to education;" 1830, "pertaining to education;" from education + -al (1). Meaning "intending or serving to educate" is attested by 1935. Related: Educationally. We do not, therefore, consider it any especial merit of a new dictionary, that it contains a large number of …

› Verified 3 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/educational Go Now

• Get more: The origin of educationGo Now

education Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: Higher education is attested by 1839. The French distinguish l'instruction secondaire, which includes what we term a liberal education, from l'instruction supérieure, which denotes professional education; but I do not think the corresponding English phrases are used with this distinction. [William Whewell, "Of …

› Verified 6 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=2&q=education Go Now

• Get more: English word originsGo Now

educational Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: educational. . 1650s, "due to education;" 1830, "pertaining to education;" from education + -al (1). Meaning "intending or serving to educate" is attested by 1935. Related: Educationally. We do not, therefore, consider it any especial merit of a new dictionary, that it contains a large number of …

› Verified 7 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=educational Go Now

• Get more: Root word of educationGo Now

education Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: The bias of education, the bias of class-relationships, the bias of nationality, the political bias, the theological bias—these, added to the constitutional sympathies and antipathies, have much more influence in determining beliefs on social questions than has the small amount of evidence collected.

› Verified 7 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=10&q=education Go Now

• Get more: Latin word for educationGo Now

education Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: busy-work. . also busy work, "work done simply to keep one occupied," 1884, American English, originally in primary education, from busy (adj.) + work (n.).. How to keep little children busy while not reciting, is the despair of many a teacher. Miss Goodyear solves the problem by introducing a modification of the kindergarten occupations, which she denominates "busy work."

› Verified 6 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=4&q=education Go Now

• Get more: Etymology free onlineGo Now

education Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: The online etymology dictionary is the internet's go-to source for quick and reliable accounts of the origin and history of English words, phrases, and idioms. It is professional enough to satisfy academic standards, but accessible enough to be used by anyone. The site has become a favorite resource of teachers of reading, spelling, and English as a second language.

› Verified 6 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=6&q=education Go Now

• Get more: Examples of etymology wordsGo Now

informal education Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: education . 1530s, "child-rearing," also "the training of animals," from French education (14c.) and directly from Latin educationem (nominative educatio) "a rearing, training," noun of action from past-participle stem of educare (see educate).Originally of instruction in social codes and manners; meaning "systematic schooling and training for work" is from 1610s.

› Verified 6 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=informal%20education Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

informal education Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: middle class . 1766, in a British sense, "class of people socially intermediate between the aristocratic and the laboring classes, the community of untitled but well-bred or wealthy people," from middle (adj.) + class (n.). As an adjective, "pertaining to the middle class," by 1857, with reference to education.

› Verified 7 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=informal%20education&type=2 Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

co-education Origin and meaning of co-education by

Details: co-education (n.) also coeducation, "joint education," specifically of young men and young women in the same institution, 1852, from co- + education.

› Verified 4 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/co-education Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

education Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: The online etymology dictionary is the internet's go-to source for quick and reliable accounts of the origin and history of English words, phrases, and idioms. It is professional enough to satisfy academic standards, but accessible enough to be used by anyone. The site has become a favorite resource of teachers of reading, spelling, and English as a second language.

› Verified 6 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=7&q=education Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

informal education Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: higher . comparative of high (adj.), Old English hierra (West Saxon), hera (Anglian). Higher education is attested by 1839.. The French distinguish l'instruction secondaire, which includes what we term a liberal education, from l'instruction supérieure, which denotes professional education; but I do not think the corresponding English phrases are used with this distinction.

› Verified 8 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=2&q=informal%20education&type=0 Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

education Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: middle class. . 1766, in a British sense, "class of people socially intermediate between the aristocratic and the laboring classes, the community of untitled but well-bred or wealthy people," from middle (adj.) + class (n.). As an adjective, "pertaining to the middle class," by 1857, with reference to education.

› Verified 6 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=5&q=education Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

pedagogics of higher education Search Online Etymology

Details: education . 1530s, "child-rearing," also "the training of animals," from French education (14c.) and directly from Latin educationem (nominative educatio) "a rearing, training," noun of action from past-participle stem of educare (see educate).Originally of instruction in social codes and manners; meaning "systematic schooling and training for work" is from 1610s.

› Verified 3 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=1&q=pedagogics%20of%20higher%20education&type= Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

informal education Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: The online etymology dictionary is the internet's go-to source for quick and reliable accounts of the origin and history of English words, phrases, and idioms. It is professional enough to satisfy academic standards, but accessible enough to be used by anyone. The site has become a favorite resource of teachers of reading, spelling, and English as a second language.

› Verified 9 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=13&q=informal%20education&type=0 Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

informal education Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: busy-work . also busy work, "work done simply to keep one occupied," 1884, American English, originally in primary education, from busy (adj.) + work (n.).. How to keep little children busy while not reciting, is the despair of many a teacher. Miss Goodyear solves the problem by introducing a modification of the kindergarten occupations, which she denominates "busy work."

› Verified 8 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=4&q=informal%20education&type=0 Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

co-educational Origin and meaning of co-educational by

Details: CO-EDUCATIONAL Meaning: "involving or pertaining to joint education of men and women at the same institution," 1868, from… See definitions of co-educational.

› Verified 6 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/co-educational Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

educate Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: education . 1530s, "child-rearing," also "the training of animals," from French education (14c.) and directly from Latin educationem (nominative educatio) "a rearing, training," noun of action from past-participle stem of educare (see educate).Originally of instruction in social codes and manners; meaning "systematic schooling and training for work" is from 1610s.

› Verified 3 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=educate Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

pedagogics of higher education Search Online Etymology

Details: Chautauqua "assembly for popular education," 1873, from town in New York, U.S., where an annual Methodist summer colony featured lectures. The name is from ja'dahgweh, a Seneca (Iroquoian) name, possibly meaning "one has taken out fish there," but an alternative suggested meaning is "raised body."

› Verified 3 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=7&q=pedagogics%20of%20higher%20education&type= Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

pedagogics of higher education Search Online Etymology

Details: The online etymology dictionary is the internet's go-to source for quick and reliable accounts of the origin and history of English words, phrases, and idioms. It is professional enough to satisfy academic standards, but accessible enough to be used by anyone. The site has become a favorite resource of teachers of reading, spelling, and English as a second language.

› Verified 3 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=5&q=pedagogics%20of%20higher%20education&type= Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

informal education Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: Chautauqua. "assembly for popular education," 1873, from town in New York, U.S., where an annual Methodist summer colony featured lectures. The name is from ja'dahgweh, a Seneca (Iroquoian) name, possibly meaning "one has taken out fish there," but an alternative suggested meaning is "raised body."

› Verified 7 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=informal%20education&type=1 Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

pedagogics of higher education Search Online Etymology

Details: The study of [the classics] is fitly called a liberal education, because it emancipates the mind from every narrow provincialism, whether of egoism or tradition, and is the apprenticeship that every one must serve before becoming a free brother of the guild which passes the torch of life from age to age. [James Russell Lowell, "Among my Books"]

› Verified 3 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=4&q=pedagogics%20of%20higher%20education&type= Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

educated Origin and meaning of educated by Online

Details: educated (adj.) 1660s, past-participle adjective from educate (v.). As an abbreviated way to say well-educated, attested from 1855. Educated guess first attested 1954.

› Verified Just Now

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/educated Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

miseducation Origin and meaning of miseducation by

Details: MISEDUCATION Meaning: "wrong or faulty education," 1620s, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + education. See definitions of miseducation.

› Verified 4 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/miseducation Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

educationist Origin and meaning of educationist by

Details: EDUCATIONIST Meaning: "one versed in the theory and practice of education," 1815; see education + -ist. See definitions of educationist.

› Verified 4 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/educationist Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

formal education Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: education . 1530s, "child-rearing," also "the training of animals," from French education (14c.) and directly from Latin educationem (nominative educatio) "a rearing, training," noun of action from past-participle stem of educare (see educate).Originally of instruction in social codes and manners; meaning "systematic schooling and training for work" is from 1610s.

› Verified 2 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=formal+education Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

teaching Origin and meaning of teaching by Online

Details: a doctrine that is taught; the teachings of religion. Synonyms: precept / commandment. teaching ( n.) the activities of educating or instructing; activities that impart knowledge or skill; good classroom teaching is seldom rewarded. Synonyms: education / instruction / pedagogy / didactics / educational activity. From wordnet.princeton.edu.

› Verified Just Now

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/teaching Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

educative Origin and meaning of educative by Online

Details: EDUCATIVE Meaning: "tending to educate, consisting in educating," 1795, from Latin educat-, past-participle stem of educare… See definitions of educative.

› Verified 1 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/educative Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

higher Origin and meaning of higher by Online Etymology

Details: higher . comparative of high (adj.), Old English hierra (West Saxon), hera (Anglian). Higher education is attested by 1839.. The French distinguish l'instruction secondaire, which includes what we term a liberal education, from l'instruction supérieure, which denotes professional education; but I do not think the corresponding English phrases are used with this distinction.

› Verified 8 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/higher Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

educator Origin and meaning of educator by Online

Details: educator (n.) 1560s, "one who nourishes or rears;" 1670s, "one who trains or instructs," from Latin educator (in classical Latin, "a foster father," then also "a tutor"), agent noun from past participle stem of educare (see educate).Latin educatrix meant "a nurse."

› Verified Just Now

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/educator Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

schooling Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: education . 1530s, "child-rearing," also "the training of animals," from French education (14c.) and directly from Latin educationem (nominative educatio) "a rearing, training," noun of action from past-participle stem of educare (see educate).Originally of instruction in social codes and manners; meaning "systematic schooling and training for work" is from 1610s.

› Verified 5 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=schooling Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

teaching Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: The online etymology dictionary is the internet's go-to source for quick and reliable accounts of the origin and history of English words, phrases, and idioms. It is professional enough to satisfy academic standards, but accessible enough to be used by anyone. The site has become a favorite resource of teachers of reading, spelling, and English as a second language.

› Verified 5 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=4&q=teaching Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

teaching Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: The online etymology dictionary is the internet's go-to source for quick and reliable accounts of the origin and history of English words, phrases, and idioms. It is professional enough to satisfy academic standards, but accessible enough to be used by anyone. The site has become a favorite resource of teachers of reading, spelling, and English as a second language.

› Verified 5 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?page=5&q=teaching Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

humanism Origin and meaning of humanism by Online

Details: humanism (n.) along with humanist used in a variety of philosophical and theological senses 16c.-18c., especially ones concerned with the (mere) humanity of Christ, or imitating Latin humanitas "education befitting a cultivated man." See human (adj.) + -ism.In the sense "the doctrine or science of human nature," humanics (1864) has been used. From 1832 in reference to "intelligent study and

› Verified Just Now

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/humanism Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

pedagogy Search Online Etymology Dictionary

Details: The online etymology dictionary is the internet's go-to source for quick and reliable accounts of the origin and history of English words, phrases, and idioms. It is professional enough to satisfy academic standards, but accessible enough to be used by anyone. The site has become a favorite resource of teachers of reading, spelling, and English as a second language.

› Verified 4 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=pedagogy Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

physical Origin and meaning of physical by Online

Details: physical (adj.) early 15c., phisical, "medicinal" (opposed to surgical), from Medieval Latin physicalis "of nature, natural," from Latin physica "study of nature" (see physic). The meaning "pertaining to matter, of or pertaining to what is perceived by the senses" is from 1590s; the meaning "having to do with the body, corporeal, pertaining to the material part or structure of an organized

› Verified Just Now

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/physical Go Now

› Get more:  StudyGo Now

pedagogy Origin and meaning of pedagogy by Online

Details: pedagogy ( n.) the profession of a teacher; pedagogy is recognized as an important profession. Synonyms: teaching / instruction. pedagogy ( n.) the activities of educating or instructing; activities that impart knowledge or skill; Synonyms: education / instruction / teaching / didactics / educational activity. From wordnet.princeton.edu.

› Verified Just Now

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/pedagogy Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

educrat Origin and meaning of educrat by Online

Details: educrat (n.) "officer, administrator, or other bureaucrat in a school system," 1968, usually pejorative, "a word that suggests overpaid, underworked and generally useless paper-pushers shielded by a cushion of taxpayer-funded job security" ["Houston Chronicle," Jan. 26, 2017]. The first element is …

› Verified 9 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/educrat Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

ignorance Origin and meaning of ignorance by Online

Details: ignorance (n.) c. 1200, "lack of wisdom or knowledge," from Old French ignorance (12c.), from Latin ignorantia "want of knowledge" (see ignorant ). Ignoration (1832) has been used in the sense "act of ignoring." The proverb, in the form "Where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise", is from Gray's "Ode on a …

› Verified 1 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/ignorance Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

liberal arts Origin and meaning of phrase liberal arts

Details: liberal arts (n.) late 14c., translating Latin artes liberales; the name for the seven attainments directed to intellectual enlargement, rather than immediate practical purpose, and thus deemed worthy of a free man (liberal in this sense is opposed to servile or mechanical).They were divided into the trivium-- grammar, logic, rhetoric (see trivial) -- and the quadrivium-- arithmetic, geometry

› Verified 6 days ago

› Url: https://www.etymonline.com/word/liberal%20arts Go Now

› Get more:  EducationGo Now

Related topics